Downtown To-Go

Support local downtown eateries and businesses that remain open during this tough time. Call in a to-go order to scoop up or have delivered. Many downtown retailers and boutiques have online shopping options available to pick-up or ship right to your door.

Check out the list of merchants and their Facebook pages for current or changes to offerings.

Dining

4amDrive-thru and Delivery
Alley Cat Pick-up
Butter’dudderPick-up
Corner CafePick-up
Gallery Row CoffeePick-up and Delivery
Highland DeliPick-up
La Fiesta – Pick-up
Little Hawaiian’s Bakery 27 Pick-up
La TrattoriaPick-up and Delivery through DoorDash/JackRabbit
LocoMexPick-up and Delivery
Nama Asian FusionPick-up and Delivery through DoorDash
Pita PitPick-up and Delivery
Sam’s House Memphis BBQPick-up (Wednesday – Saturday)
Shuckers Oyster HousePick-up and Delivery
Suttons Pick-up

Retail and Services

Elle SalonProducts available Online
Horton’s BooksOnline
Indulge Salon & Day Spa – Products/Gift Certificates Online, Pick-up, Delivery
Institute of Imagination / Play PretendCurbside Creative Service
Laurel Rose Co.Online
Main Street BoutiqueOnline and Facebook
Merle NormanCall Ahead Pick-up, Delivery, Shipping
Square RecordsOnline
Spa 3:16Online and select services available at Bremen location
Underground BooksOnline
Westside Curb Market

Did we miss one? Email us at mainstreet@carrollton-ga.gov and we’ll update!

Carrollton Coronavirus Precautionary Measures

In support of state and local efforts to slow the spread of the Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19), the City of Carrollton will be taking the following precautionary measures: 

Effective immediately, we are postponing and/or canceling all large public events, meetings, programs and classes for a two-week period, or until further guidance recommends otherwise. This includes, but is not limited to, all city-sponsored events, city-permitted events, tournaments and rentals in city-owned facilities. Cancellations and rescheduled dates of affected events will be announced on their respective social media pages, our carrolltonga.com and department webpages. We will continue to update you on the status of events based on CDC recommendations.

Beginning Monday, March 16, 2020, all City facilities will be closed to the public until March 29. As we receive further information or guidance, we will communicate any changes. This includes, but is not limited to; City Hall, Parks and Recreation facilities, city parks, Center for the Arts, Senior Center, Depot on Bradley and The Amp. Our drive-through window at City Hall will remain open for utility bill payment, but we strongly encourage customers to utilize online services for utility billing, permits, etc. Some services will also be available by phone. Please contact our main line at 770-830-2000 to be directed to the appropriate department. Specific contact information will be listed online at https://carrolltonga.com/

Essential services such as police, fire, sanitation and water will continue as normal. 

While the risk to the general public remains low at this time,  these measures are being taken out of an abundance of caution to protect the safety and wellbeing of our community. For updates, please visit https://carrolltonga.com/covid19 


Do business with us from anywhere!

Utility payments can be made online at https://www.municipalonlinepayments.com/carrolltonga or by phone at 833-892-0172. You can also use the drive-through or drop box at City Hall.

Permit and license applications can be found online at https://carrolltonga.com/doing-business-with-the-city/ or call 770-830-2000.

For local information about COVID-19, visit Tanner Health System at http://www.tanner.org/coronavirus. For additional information, visit Georgia’s Department of Health at https://dph.georgia.gov/novelcoronavirus or find answers to frequently asked questions at https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/about/index.html.


Worried about Coronavirus (COVID-19)?  You can prevent the spread of COVID-19!
• Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care.
•  Cover your coughs and sneezes with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
•  Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom; before eating; and after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.
• Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
• Clean frequently touched surfaces and objects daily.
Learn more here.

Quilt Expo and Exhibits

The Carrollton Center for the Arts and the Southeastern Quilt and Textile Museum are joining forces this week to showcase the art of quilting, beginning February 21. The quilt museum’s Imagine 2020: A Quilting Expo, February 21 and 22, will feature exhibits, vendors, workshops, speakers and demonstrations for quilters at the Center for the Arts and at the museum.

In conjunction with the expo, the center will host a public reception starting at 5:00 p.m. to mark the opening of JAM Session, an invitational exhibit in the Roush Gallery of works by the members of the Georgia/South Carolina region of Studio Art Quilt Associates.

“These quilts show the potential of the medium to express complex ideas and realistic imagery, which can be difficult to do with sewn fabric,” said Carrollton Visual Arts Coordinator Marcella Kuykendall. “The four artists approach their pieces in a unique fashion, allowing visitors to see several techniques and viewpoints within one exhibit.“

In conjunction with Studio Art Quilt Associates, the quilt museum will host a show in their gallery called A Thread Runs Through It through the end of April.

“I would say that these exhibits are not your grandmother’s quilts,” said Tim Chapman, Carrollton’s arts superintendent. “The quilts do not include repetition in design and therefore might lead the viewer to think they are paintings.”

As an expo extra, the Carrollton Presbyterian Church will host A Congregation of Quilts, a free exhibition by the West Georgia Quilt Guild, from 9am-4pm, also on February 21.

School Break Arts Camps

As students take a break from school this month and again in April, Carrollton Center for the Arts’ camps offer several opportunities for them to stay creative and have fun outside of the traditional classroom environment. While most of the center’s regular classes and programs will not meet during the weeks of February 17 and April 6, young people can learn about pastry, robotics and the technical side of the arts, working with clay and theatre production — from a murder mystery to the Land of Oz.

Pastry Chef Camp
This kids-only cooking camp, taught by LaToya Gamble, will teach pastry, baking skills and confectionery techniques. Each day of camp will focus on a specific dessert finale.
Winter Camp: Feb. 17 – 19, 9am –12pm, Ages: 6 – 7
Spring Camp: April 6 – 10, 9am –12pm, Ages: 8 – 12
Member Fee: $75 per person
Non-Member Fee: $85 per person

ARTS + TECH Bootcamp
The Center for the Arts and the Neva Lomason Public Library team up to explore how technology like robots, video production tools and even Legos can open up new ways for students to express themselves.
Feb 17 – 19, 9:30am – 12pm
Ages: 8 – 12
Free

Creative Clay Camp
Instructor Melanie Drew will teach hand-building skills, from preparing the clay to slab building, coiling and the wheel, before the works are glazed and fired.
April 6– 10, 12pm – 3pm
Ages: 6 – 12
Member Fee: $75 per person
Non-Member Fee: $85 per person

Wizard of Oz Camp
Campers will learn dances, songs, lines and blocking, create simple costumes and sets and take part in theatre exercises to build confidence and improve overall performance. The class will present a 30-minute production of scenes from The Wizard of Oz. Tammy Barton is the camp’s instructor.
April 6– 10, 1am – 4pm
Ages: 5 – 7
Member Fee: $75 per person
Non-Member Fee: $85 per person

Murder Mystery Theatre Camp
Instructor Jenny Lyle’s camp will explore the murder-mystery genre while students hone their acting and performance skills. The week will end with a spaghetti dinner, followed by a theatre performance with guests investigating the crime. The evening event starts at 6pm.
April 6– 10, 9am – 12pm
Ages: 8 – 12
Member Fee: $75 per person
Non-Member Fee: $85 per person

Register for these camps now online here, by phone at (770) 838-1083 or at the Center for the Arts’ box office at 251 Alabama Street.

Daddy/Daughter/Mother/Son Dances

Dads and moms, enjoy a fun night with your special girl or boy at the Carrollton Parks and Recreation Department’s annual Daddy/Daughter/Mother/Son dances, February 10, 11 and 13. The dances at the Depot on Bradley Street will feature hors d’oeuvres and desserts, door prizes and a gift for every child.

Daddy/Daughter Dances
February 10 and 11, 2020, 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
February 10: Pre-K through 3rd Grade.
February 11: Grades 4-8.

Mother/Son Dance
February 13, 2020, 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Pre-K through 8th Grade

$30 per couple, $10 each additional child


Register at carrolltonparksandrec.com or call 770-832-1161 for more information.

‘Mountainfilm’ brings Telluride to Carrollton

Mountainfilm on Tour is coming to the Carrollton Center for the Arts, January 4, bringing a selection of adventure-packed and inspiring documentary films selected from Telluride, Colorado’s annual Mountainfilm festival.

“We are excited to welcome this high-caliber event to Carrollton again this year,” said Carrollton Arts Superintendent Tim Chapman. “Our altogether original community is the perfect audience for Mountainfilm’s unique and inspiring films.”

Founded in 1979, the event is one of America’s longest-running film festivals, held every Memorial Day weekend in Telluride. Mountainfilm is also a nonprofit organization that celebrates stories of indomitable spirit and aims to inspire audiences through film, art and ideas.

The Carrollton event will feature a collection of documentary short films that align with Mountainfilm’s mission to use the power of film, art and ideas to encourage audiences to create a better world. A presenter will guide the audience through the program, providing insight on the films, filmmakers and subjects.

Doors open for the event at 6:30 p.m. and the show will kick off at 7:00 p.m. See the complete playlist at www.mountainfilm.org/tour/schedule. Purchase tickets for $5 at carrolltonarts.com, by calling (770) 838-1083 or at the center’s box office at 251 Alabama Street in Carrollton.

Mountainfilm on Tour is hosted by the Carrollton Center for the Arts in partnership with the Alice Huffard Richards Foundation.

‘Cultivated’ & ‘Fiber Stories’ Open Jan. 3

A pair of exhibits using unconventional media and methods to depict life in the mountains and rural South will kick off the Carrollton Center for the Arts’ new year, January 3. Ted Whisenhunt’s whimsical interactive exhibit, Cultivated, celebrates the ingenuity, folklore and music of rural Appalachia and runs through Feb. 13. Fiber Stories, an exhibit featuring artist Annie Greene’s creations using mixed-media and yarn, closes Feb. 1. Both exhibits will be launched with a reception at the center at 5:00 p.m. on their shared opening night.

“Both of these artists are masters of their media and they complement each other so well,” said Arts Superintendent Tim Chapman. “Each artist shows work representative of the South and has a narrative component to their work.”

Rural Appalachia and life in the early 20th Century are the sources of inspiration for Whisenhunt’s work, which features movement and encourages viewer interaction by incorporating hand-cranked mechanical systems. The Alabama native currently lives in North Georgia and is a professor of art at Young Harris College.

“One of the most interesting aspects of Whisenhunt’s work is his playful mix of materials and moving pieces,” said Carrollton Visual Art Coordinator, Marcella Kuykendall. “Metal insects dance above animals with the turn of a crank, a bird takes flight with a soft tug of a pulley and a mixed media whirlygig hovers above a patchwork cow, ready to grab the wind. Viewers will get a rare chance to carefully touch the works as they help the sculptures to come alive.”

Georgia native and LaGrange resident, Annie Greene is best known for her yarn paintings featuring colorful knitting yarns outlined in black embroidery thread. Her paintings reflect culturally and socially relevant images of her life as an African-American in the rural South.

“Viewers will be intrigued by the details Greene creates with rows and swirls of colorful yarn,” said Carrollton Visual Arts Coordinator, Marcella Kuykendall. “It can take observers who are new to the works several minutes to figure out that the they are made of fibers. It has been fun installing the exhibit and seeing the surprise on each passerby’s face as they realize the material and time it took to produce each piece.“

Workshop: Upcycling Gift Bags and Boxes

The Carrollton Center for the Arts’ Gallery Play workshop, Upcycled Gift Bags & Boxes, on November 23, will show participants how to make and decorate colorful gift containers using an assortment of art materials, recyclables and their own creativity.

“It is amazing to me what you can do with bits of paper, scraps from craft projects and other leftover items,” said the center’s visual arts coordinator, Marcella Kuykendall. “This workshop will be a creative exploration of upcycling craftiness, with Alan Kuykendall participating as one of the instructors. If you have a particular small present in mind or want to purchase a piece from our Small Packages exhibit, we can help come up with ideas to beautifully conceal that special gift.”

The workshop runs from 6 – 7:00 p.m. All ages are welcome, but young children will need assistance from their parents. Those wanting an evening of the arts can stick around for the Christmas opera, Amahl and the Night Visitors, which starts at 7:30 p.m. The registration fee for the workshop is $10. Amahl tickets are $18 for adults and $10 for youth. Call 770-838-1083 or visit https://carrolltonarts.com/ to register, buy tickets or for more information.

Christmas in Carrollton

Whether it’s an altogether magical performance of a classic ballet, parading through downtown with Santa, finding a unique gift or just sharing a cup of good cheer, ’tis the season to celebrate Christmas in Carrollton!

Small Packages
Through December 14
Carrollton Center for the Arts

Great things come in small packages. These small-but-mighty works, created by members of the Carrollton Artist Guild, fit within a 12 x 12 x 12-inch space, come in a variety of media and styles and make great gifts for friends, family — or yourself. The Carrollton Writer’s Guild will present a selection of their members’ books, poems and other writings, which will also be available for purchase.

Christmas in Carrollton Choral Concert
December 13, 7:30pm
December 14, 4:00pm & 7:30pm
Carrollton Center for the Arts

Since the Carroll County Community Chorus was founded in 1979, it has become a Carrollton tradition to celebrate the holidays with the group’s Christmas concert. This year, the chorus will present both traditional Christmas music and some new holiday choral arrangements. Directed by Jack Gantt. Tickets: $10.

Carroll Community Wind Ensemble Winter Concert
December 16, 7:30pm
Carrollton Center for the Arts

The Carroll Community Wind Ensemble was founded in 2011 and is open to anyone living in West Georgia/East Alabama who played a symphonic band instrument in high school or college. The group has become a vital part of the musical life of Carroll County, Don’t miss their popular winter show at the Center for the Arts. Tickets: $10 Adults / $5 Youth

Christmas with the CSO
December 19 – 20, 7:30pm
Carrollton Center for the Arts

The Carroll Symphony Orchestra is a West Georgia treasure. Christmas with the CSO is a Carrollton tradition. This year, the orchestra will perform the soundtrack of Polar Express and feature a local community choir. Patrons will again have the opportunity to submit musical requests for CSO Conductor Terry Lowry to perform on the piano. Tickets: $18 Adults / $10 Youth.

Main Street Awards Grants to Businesses

With help from Carrollton Main Street’s Downtown Beautification Grants, two local businesses are sporting new exterior upgrades.

“Over the last eight and a half years, we have worked hard to transform this odd little basement space into a quirky and lovable destination for book lovers from all over the southeastern United States,” said Josh Niesse, owner of Underground Books, whose new awning over the store’s entrance on Alabama Street was partially funded by one of the grants. “We are so grateful to Main Street for enabling us to make the beauty and life inside our shop more visible on the outside of our building.”

The purpose of the Main Street Downtown Beautification Program is to stimulate downtown development, improve the visual image of properties within the Main Street district and generate pride in the community.

“As with a lot of small businesses just starting out it took everything I had to scrape enough together to get the doors open and I have to stay scrappy to keep them open,” said Shane Galloway, owner of 4 AM Coffee Roasters, who used the grant to help pay for their new sign beside Highway 27. “I have tried to start the retail shop for 4 AM in other cities that weren’t as eager to see new businesses flourish. Carrollton makes it seem like they really want independent businesses and Main Street is the face of that commitment. The Main Street Grant helped us put up a real sign that makes us feel more permanent, helps us move toward being the welcoming spot that we want to be and, of course, helps business”

Successful grant applicants may receive up to $2,500 per project and must match the grant funding, dollar for dollar. The money can be used for awnings, signage and exterior painting and staining on the building, trim and door.

“The Main Street Board is thrilled to partner with our downtown merchants,” said Main Street board member, Lauren Yates. “It’s a pleasure to see how they have worked to improve their signage, storefronts and awnings. The beautification of our downtown benefits all property owners, business owners and patrons alike and adds vibrancy to our downtown area, thus attracting more people to enjoy everything our city has to offer.”