‘Mountainfilm’ brings Telluride to Carrollton

Mountainfilm on Tour is coming to the Carrollton Center for the Arts, January 4, bringing a selection of adventure-packed and inspiring documentary films selected from Telluride, Colorado’s annual Mountainfilm festival.

“We are excited to welcome this high-caliber event to Carrollton again this year,” said Carrollton Arts Superintendent Tim Chapman. “Our altogether original community is the perfect audience for Mountainfilm’s unique and inspiring films.”

Founded in 1979, the event is one of America’s longest-running film festivals, held every Memorial Day weekend in Telluride. Mountainfilm is also a nonprofit organization that celebrates stories of indomitable spirit and aims to inspire audiences through film, art and ideas.

The Carrollton event will feature a collection of documentary short films that align with Mountainfilm’s mission to use the power of film, art and ideas to encourage audiences to create a better world. A presenter will guide the audience through the program, providing insight on the films, filmmakers and subjects.

Doors open for the event at 6:30 p.m. and the show will kick off at 7:00 p.m. See the complete playlist at www.mountainfilm.org/tour/schedule. Purchase tickets for $5 at carrolltonarts.com, by calling (770) 838-1083 or at the center’s box office at 251 Alabama Street in Carrollton.

Mountainfilm on Tour is hosted by the Carrollton Center for the Arts in partnership with the Alice Huffard Richards Foundation.

‘Cultivated’ & ‘Fiber Stories’ Open Jan. 3

A pair of exhibits using unconventional media and methods to depict life in the mountains and rural South will kick off the Carrollton Center for the Arts’ new year, January 3. Ted Whisenhunt’s whimsical interactive exhibit, Cultivated, celebrates the ingenuity, folklore and music of rural Appalachia and runs through Feb. 13. Fiber Stories, an exhibit featuring artist Annie Greene’s creations using mixed-media and yarn, closes Feb. 1. Both exhibits will be launched with a reception at the center at 5:00 p.m. on their shared opening night.

“Both of these artists are masters of their media and they complement each other so well,” said Arts Superintendent Tim Chapman. “Each artist shows work representative of the South and has a narrative component to their work.”

Rural Appalachia and life in the early 20th Century are the sources of inspiration for Whisenhunt’s work, which features movement and encourages viewer interaction by incorporating hand-cranked mechanical systems. The Alabama native currently lives in North Georgia and is a professor of art at Young Harris College.

“One of the most interesting aspects of Whisenhunt’s work is his playful mix of materials and moving pieces,” said Carrollton Visual Art Coordinator, Marcella Kuykendall. “Metal insects dance above animals with the turn of a crank, a bird takes flight with a soft tug of a pulley and a mixed media whirlygig hovers above a patchwork cow, ready to grab the wind. Viewers will get a rare chance to carefully touch the works as they help the sculptures to come alive.”

Georgia native and LaGrange resident, Annie Greene is best known for her yarn paintings featuring colorful knitting yarns outlined in black embroidery thread. Her paintings reflect culturally and socially relevant images of her life as an African-American in the rural South.

“Viewers will be intrigued by the details Greene creates with rows and swirls of colorful yarn,” said Carrollton Visual Arts Coordinator, Marcella Kuykendall. “It can take observers who are new to the works several minutes to figure out that the they are made of fibers. It has been fun installing the exhibit and seeing the surprise on each passerby’s face as they realize the material and time it took to produce each piece.“

Mayor and Council to be Sworn In Jan. 2

A reception and swearing-in ceremony will welcome Carrollton’s new mayor and new and returning councilmembers, January 2. The ceremony will be held at the Carrollton Center for the Arts, at 251 Alabama Street, during a special called meeting of the council.

Incoming Mayor Betty Cason, newly-elected Ward 4 Councilmember Bob Uglum and re-elected Councilmember Jim Watters will be sworn in at 7:00 p.m. after a public reception in the center’s lobby that starts at 6:00 p.m.

Cason served as Carroll County Probate Judge for two decades before retiring last year. Uglum was the long-time owner of the Maple Street Mansion restaurant. Ward 3 Councilmember Watters will be starting his third term on the council. Ward 2 Councilmember Brett Ledbetter was sworn in last month to fill the unexpired term of Rory Wojcik. Ward 1 Councilmember Gerald Byrd is the longest-serving member of the council, currently in the middle of his fifth full term.

Firefighters Save Choking Child

The crew of Carrollton City Fire Department Engine 24 saved a three-year-old girl from choking, Nov. 22, at the Wells Fargo Bank on Bankhead Highway. The child choked on a piece of candy and was unconscious and no longer breathing when the fire crew arrived. Firefighters Chad Thigpen, Jimmy Appleby and Jared McKenzie cleared the girl’s airway. Fire department officials say the girl is doing well and in good health.

The three will be recognized for the accomplishment during a Carrollton City Council meeting in January. Fire Chief Jimmy Bearden said in a written statement, “The child was within seconds of death and without the intervention of the firefighters, the child probably would not have survived. We are very proud of our dedicated firefighters and honored to recognize them for their life-saving efforts.”
Photo by Jay Luzardo, courtesy of the Times-Georgian